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Windows Server blog by Kurt Roggen [BE]

Windows Server 2008 R2 and Windows 7 SP1 has shipped.

  • Volume Licensed, MSDN and TechNet subscribers get access February 16
  • All customers get access February 22 through Windows Update and direct download

Hot features are Hyper-V Dynamic Memory and Remote FX.

For more information: Windows Server team blog

Here’s a quick summary of the issues fixes with the February rollup release.

Issue 1
Performance and Resource Optimization (PRO) Tip alerts are not displayed in the SCVMM Admin Console if the alert resolution state is set to a value other than 0 in System Center Operations Manager 2007.

Issue 2
If a network adapter for a Hyper-V host uses teaming software, Virtual Machine Manager (VMM) may incorrectly bind the Virtual Switch to the host network adapter.

Issue 3
A Virtual-to-Virtual (V2V) migration to a Cluster Shared Volume (CSV) volume fails if the cluster node that owns the volume has insufficient disk space on the system volume. Additionally, you receive an error message that resembles the following:

Error 2606 - Unable to perform the job because one or more of the selected objects are locked by another job.

Issue 4
A Physical-to-Virtual (P2V) migration from a computer that is running Windows Server 2003 fails. Additionally, you receive an error message that resembles the following:
Error 416  - Agent installation timed out while waiting on service VMMAgentInstaller on servername.domain.com.

Issue 5
The network migration of a highly available virtual machine to a different cluster fails. Additionally, you receive an error message that resembles the following:
Error (12711) -  VMM cannot complete the WMI operation on server servername.domain.com because of error: [MSCluster_ResourceGroup.Name="4168e895-2831-32cf-b4d8-352ac13e28c9"] The cluster group could not be found. 
(The cluster group could not be found (0x1395))

 

To automate your installation, use  msiexec /update PackageName.msp BOOTSTRAPPED=1

Download here

For more information: KB 2492980

The Remote Desktop Services Connector for System Center Virtual Machine Manager (RDS Connector for VMM) enables Remote Desktop Services in Windows Server 2008 R2 to use the virtual machine placement capabilities of System Center Virtual Machine Manager (VMM) 2008 R2 for personal virtual desktops.

A personal virtual desktop is a virtual machine that is assigned to a user account in Active Directory Domain Services (AD DS) and is hosted on a Remote Desktop Virtualization Host (RD Virtualization Host) server. The RDS Connector for VMM enables communication between a Remote Desktop Connection Broker (RD Connection Broker) server and a VMM server. An RD Connection Broker server is used to provide users access to their personal virtual desktops.
With the RDS Connector for VMM connector installed and configured, if the virtual machine that is configured as a personal virtual desktop cannot be started on its current RD Virtualization Host server, VMM will choose the best RD Virtualization Host server to place the virtual machine, based on the host rating determined by VMM.

Download here

For more complete information, read the “Remote Desktop Services Connector for Virtual Machine Manager Installation and Configuration Guide

HP ProLiant Network Teaming software – Network Configuration Utility (NCU) - supports VLANs defined within Hyper-V virtual machines without creating separate (dedicated) “HP virtual team network adapters” per VLAN since version 10.10.x.x of NCU.

The latest HP white paper on the HP ProLiant Network Teaming for Hyper-V now also contains some guidelines for this “VLAN Promiscuous” mode.
It can be downloaded here.

image

Related reading:

We’re pleased to announce System Center VMM 2008 R2 Service Pack 1 RC is now ready for the general public!
This release adds support for Dynamic Memory and RemoteFX features in Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1 RC

Dynamic Memory

image image  

RemoteFX

image image image

It is being uploaded to Microsoft Connect now. Since this is a pre-release version, usage of this is limited to test environments only.

Customers are encouraged to ask questions via the SC VMM forums on TechNet.  Feedback can be submitted directly to the product team via Microsoft Connect.

UPGRADE MATRIX: You can use this SP1 RC to upgrade from SCVMM 2008 R2 and you will be able to upgrade from this SP1 RC to the SCVMM 2008 R2 SP1 RTM.

 

Download here

For more information about Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1 RC, please check out this FAQ.

Related links:

Q: How to remove a missing VMs from the VMM Administrator Console?
A: You will have to do some cleanup using SQL Management Studio.
More information: http://blogs.technet.com/b/m2/archive/2010/04/16/removing-missing-vms-from-the-vmm-administrator-console.aspx

Q: How to keep all VM metadata (Tags, Description, etc…) introduced in VMM when removing a VM Host (and its VMs) from VMM?
A: The SCVMM team introduced a script for saving and re-applying the virtual machine metadata in VMM.
More information: http://blogs.technet.com/b/m2/archive/2010/04/16/saving-and-re-applying-the-virtual-machine-metadata-in-vmm.aspx

Q: How to differentiate between two cmdlets with the same name, such as Get-Job?
A: Use the syntax <PSModule>\<Cmdlet>, like Get-Help Microsoft.SystemCenter.VirtualMachineManager\Get-Job or Get-Help Microsoft.PowerShell.Core\Get-Job.
More information: http://blogs.technet.com/b/m2/archive/2009/08/20/how-to-differentiate-between-two-cmdlets-with-the-same-name.aspx

Q: How to find the VM worker process (vmwp.exe) linked to a specific VM?
A: Open TaskManager’s Processes tab, to add the Commandline Colum.  For each vmwp.exe process, you’ll see the VMs GUID as startup parameter. The VMs GUID can be found in the VMs “Virtual Machines” folder where the “VM-GUID” configuration xml is stored. 

Q: How to move the SCVMM database to another server?
A: There a procedures for using SCVMMrecover.exe or using SQL Server Management Studio
More information: http://blogs.technet.com/b/mbriggs/archive/2010/01/29/how-to-move-the-scvmm-database-to-another-server.aspx

Q: How to create a VM Template with a non-English-US keyboard layout?
A: Use a Guest OS profile inside the VM template, where you specify an unattend answer file.  The answer file contains (among many other things) the keyboard layout (InputLocale,SystemLocale). 
More information: http://blogs.technet.com/b/davguents_blog/archive/2010/08/06/vmm-2008-r2-creating-template-with-keyboard-layout.aspx

Q: Why is my VM in “Unsupported Cluster Configuration” status?
A: There are a number of reasons a Virtual Machine (VM) can fall into a status of ‘Unsupported Cluster Configuration.’ A brief list, from TechNet, shows that storage, networking, and other factors can cause this status.
More information: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc967323.aspx

Q: What’s the purpose of all different Hyper-V event logs, stored in the Event Viewer under "Applications and Services Logs" ?
A: There are 10 categories that help you to diagnose a problem. Each category relates to a specific Hyper-V component.
More information: http://blogs.msdn.com/b/virtual_pc_guy/archive/2009/02/02/looking-at-the-hyper-v-event-log.aspx

Q: How to remove lingering (virtual) Internal NICs?
A: Locate the lingering NIC in the registry under HKLM\CCS\Enum\Root\MS_MP\000x and remove complete key (under LocalSystem security context).
More information: http://blogs.technet.com/b/chrad/archive/2010/02/28/hyper-v-lingering-internal-nics-unable-to-remove.aspx

Q: How to change the Owner value for all VMs in SCVMM using PS?
A: Get-VM -VMMServer "VMMserver FQDN" | where {$_.Owner -eq "Unknown"} | Set-VM -Owner "domain\account"
More information: http://blogs.technet.com/b/scvmm/archive/2009/05/21/quick-tip-how-to-change-the-owner-value-for-all-vms-in-scvmm-2008.aspx

Related reading:

PowerShell 2.0 brings some great new management functionality such as:

  • Remoting: lets you run commands on one or more remote computers from a single computer that is running Windows PowerShell. PowerShell remoting allows for multiple ways of connecting, including interactive (1:1), fan-out (1:many) and fan-in (many:1 by using the IIS hosting model).
  • New cmdlets: over 100 built-in cmdlets, enabling you to do computer-related tasks, event log and performance counter management task.

PowerShell version 2.0 is bundled into the Windows Management Framework.

The Windows Management Framework makes some updated management functionality of Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 available to be installed on Windows XP, Windows Server 2003, Windows Vista, and Windows Server 2008.

Windows Management Framework contains 3 components:

  • Windows Remote Management (WinRM) 2.0
  • Windows PowerShell 2.0
  • Background Intelligent Transfer Service (BITS) 4.0.

Using WSUS (part of Windows Server 2008 R2 as a server role), you can import the PowerShell 2.0 package and approve it for installation on your Windows Server 2008, Windows Server 2003, Windows Vista and Windows XP machines.

image
Import updates directly into WSUS

image
Add selected updates to download basket

Once the updates are imported into the WSUS infrastructure, you can approve the update on the required computer groups containing your targeted machines.

image 
Approve the imported updates

NOTE: Be aware that the Windows Management Framework is about 30-35 MB in size.  If bandwidth is an issue or if you are dealing with a serious amount of clients, you may want to throttle the bandwidth used by the Background Intelligent Transfer Service (BITS) which is used as transport mechanism by the Windows Update engine.

More about that another time…

Related reading:

To be able to troubleshoot the Windows Deployment Services, it is crucial to first understand the overall WDS architecture, since you can activate logging at most levels in the architecture.  We did that in previous post.

The second step, is drilling down into these components and their logging/debugging facilities.

Looking at WDS Configuration

To get a quick overview of your current WDS configuration, type the following command:

C:\> wdsutil /get-server /show:config

For more information, read my previous blog post.

 

Looking at WDS Eventlogs

If the multicast transmission still start automatically too soon, I suggest enabling logging for WDS Events:

1. Open Server Manager
2. Select Diagnostics -> Event Viewer -> Applications and Services Logs
3. Navigate to Microsoft\Deployment-Services-Diagnostics
4. Right-click the Admin log and choose Enable log
5. Right-click the Operational log and choose Enable log

Reproduce the issue and check the event logs.

image_thumb2

 

Looking at WDS Logging

  • WDS Server-side - %windir%\Tracing\wdsserver.log – Set REG_DWORD EnableFileTracing = 1
  • WDS Mgmt - %windir%\Tracing\wdsmgmt.log
  • WDS MMC snapin - %windir%\Tracing\wdsmmc.log
  • Client-side - X:\Windows\Panther, $Windows.~BT\Sources\Panther, %systemdrive%\Windows\Panther

image_thumb3

 

Related reading:

The other day, I got asked about WDS (Windows Deployment Services) troubleshooting…
To be able to troubleshoot the Windows Deployment Services, it is crucial to first understand the overall WDS architecture, since you can activate logging at most levels in the architecture.

Understanding the WDS Architecture

image

WDS Server Service
The WDSServer service is the main server-side service for Windows Deployment Services. It provides basic service functions such as memory management, thread pooling, and network interface binding in an effort to support its hosted subcomponents, known as providers. The providers provide the true functionality associated with WDSServer. There are five providers included with the default (Deployment Server) installation:

  • PXE provider
  • PXE server
  • Image server
  • Multicast server
  • TFTP server

WDS PXE Server
The Pre-Boot Execution Environment (PXE) server is used by Windows Deployment Services to provide network boot programs to client computers. PXE technology is a standard created by Intel that establishes a common and consistent set of pre-boot services within the boot firmware. The end goal is to enable a client to perform a network boot and receive a network boot program (NBP) from a network boot server.

WDS PXE Provider
The Pre-Boot Execution Environment (PXE) provider for Windows Deployment Services provides client boot services over the network. It registers itself with the WDSServer service (the main server-side service of the Windows Deployment Services solution) and requests a remote procedure call (RPC) endpoint.

PXE technology is a standard created by Intel that establishes a common and consistent set of pre-boot services within the boot firmware. The end goal is to enable a client to perform a network boot and receive a network boot program (NBP) from a network boot server.

WDS Image Server
The Windows Deployment Services image server stores and maintains the installation and boot images. The image server is the module used by the Windows Deployment Services client when it is communicating with the server. The server registers a remote procedure call (RPC) endpoint for communication between the client and the server.

WDS Multicast Server
The multicast server deploys an image to a large number of client computers concurrently without overburdening the network. When you create a multicast transmission for an image, the data is sent over the network only once, which can drastically reduce the network bandwidth that is used.

WDS Multicast Content Provider
The multicast server uses a content provider to transmit the data from the server to the client. The Windows Deployment Services content provider can transfer any file over a multicast transmission. This content provider connects the multicast transmission or namespace to the data that has been requested by clients.

WDS TFTP Server
You use the Windows Deployment Services Trivial File Transfer Protocol (TFTP) server to download the files that are needed to do a network boot using the Pre-Boot Execution Environment (PXE). PXE technology is a standard created by Intel that establishes a common and consistent set of pre-boot services within the boot firmware. The end goal is to enable a client to do a network boot and receive a network boot program (NBP) from a network boot server.

The TFTP server downloads boot files such as Pxeboot.com, Wdsnbp.com, Bootmgr.exe, and Default.bcd, as well as the boot image that contains Windows Preinstallation Environment (Windows PE).


Related reading:

MVP

I’m proud to announce and pleased to see that Microsoft has recognized all my contributions made in the past, by awarding me with the MVP title in Management Infrastructurefor the 3rd year in a row.

In the end, nothing really changes… I will keep doing what I have been doing so far: sharing knowledge and information. 

Hope you enjoy it, too!!
Kurt

I've been using PowerShell for a while now but it still hasn't replaced the command prompt for me yet, even though it is extremely powerful!!  I have been using the Command Prompt From Here a lot to make it easier to open up a command prompt at a specific folder location from the Explorer.  So now I added some settings to the registry that will do the same but with PowerShell instead.

image

Here is the registry file for making the entry in Explorer:

Windows Registry Editor Version 5.00

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Directory\shell\PowerShell]
@="Open PowerShell window here"

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOT\Directory\shell\PowerShell\Command]
@="\"C:\\Windows\\System32\\WindowsPowerShell\\v1.0\\powershell.exe\" -NoExit -Command [Environment]::CurrentDirectory=(Set-Location -LiteralPath:'%L' -PassThru).ProviderPath\""

Related reading:

When doing a P2V (Physical To Virtual) by moving a workload from the physical world into the virtual world, you actually don’t want those specific IHV’s network, storage and other drivers/services starting up at next boot time, because it will cause a long delay to fail all these drivers/services.  They no longer make sense in your virtual environment, where synthetic or legacy drivers take over…

There are tools out there, that assist you in removing these drivers and services (once you are on the other side) such as the HP Proliant Support Pack Cleaner tool.

But know that when doing a P2V with SCVMM, there is this undocumented manifest (BlockList.xml) that disables Services and/or Drivers during the P2V process.

On the SCVMM server, in the following location C:\Program Files\Microsoft System Center Virtual Machine Manager 2008 R2\VMMData, you can find BlockList.xml.
In this file, you can list all services and drivers to disable in a virtual machine during the P2V process.
The syntax of this file is simple and uses the short name for services and drivers.

However editing this file is not supported by Microsoft…

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" ?>
<BlockList> 
   <!-- services to disable –>
   <Service>
      <Name> </Name>
   </Service>
   <!-- drivers to disable –>
   <Driver>
      <Name> </Name>
   </Driver> 
   <!-- programs to disable –>
   <Program>
      <Name> </Name>
   </Program>
</BlockList>

When dealing with HP hardware, you may want to exclude following drivers, services and programs:

For use with HP hardware/software

Driver(s) Service(s) Program(s)
CpqArray
CpqArry2
CpqAsm2
CpqCiDrv
CpqCISSE
HpCISSs2
CpqCISSM
CpqTeamMP
SysMgmt
q57w2k
N1000
CpqNicMgmt
CpqRcmc
CpqVCagent
CqMgHost
CqMgServ
CqMgStor
CpqWebMgmt
SysDown
SysMgmtHP
CPQTeam


For use with Dell hardware/software

Still in progress


For use with IBM hardware/software

Still in progress

As you seen I’m still in the process of completing the lists for both Dell and IBM hardware, so fee free to sent me your feedback on drivers and services to disable.

Anyhow, it would definitely avoid messing around with the CLI using sc.exe

sc [\\server] query type= driver
sc [\\server] query type= service

sc [\\server] config start= disabled

 

Related reading:

To get a quick overview of your current WDS configuration, use the WDS CLI and type the following command:

C:\> wdsutil /get-server /show:config [/server:yourRemoteServer]

image_thumb12 

To get a more detailed overview of your current WDS configuration, type the following command:

C:\> wdsutil /get-server /show:all /detailed

Here’s a quick output of such a configuration listing:

C:/> WDSUTIL /get-Server /server:SEA-WDS /show:Config

Windows Deployment Services Management Utility [Version 6.0.6001.18000]
Copyright (C) Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.

SETUP INFORMATION FOR SERVER BXL-WDS
[-----------------------------------------------------------------------------]

Server State:
     OS version: 6.0
     WDS operational mode: Native

Installation State:
     REMINST location: W:\Images
     REMINST share up-to-date: Yes
     Boot files installed:
         x86  - Yes
         x64  - No
         ia64 - No

[-----------------------------------------------------------------------------]

CONFIGURATION INFORMATION FOR SERVER BXL-WDS
[-----------------------------------------------------------------------------]

Server Authorization:
     Authorization state: Not Authorized

Answer Policy:
     Answer clients: Yes
     Answer only known clients: No
     Response delay: 0 seconds

Directory Services Use Policy:
     Preferred DC: 
     Preferred GC: 
     Prestage devices using MAC: No
     New machine naming policy: %61Username%#
     Domain search order: Global Catalog Only
     New machines join domain: Yes

New Machine OU:
     OU type: Server Domain
     OU: CN=Computers,DC=contoso,DC=com

DHCP Configuration:
     DHCP service status: Not Installed
     DHCP option 60 configured: <Not Applicable>

Pxe Bind Policy:
     Use DHCP ports: Yes
     Rogue detection: Disabled
     RPC port: 5040

Interface Bind Policy:
     Policy: Exclude Registered
     Registered interfaces:

Boot Program Policy:
     Allow N12 for new clients: No
     Architecture discovery: Enabled
     Reset boot program: No
     Default boot programs:
         x86  - boot\x86\pxeboot.com
         x64  - boot\x64\pxeboot.com
         ia64 - boot\ia64\bootmgfw.efi
     Default N12 boot programs:
         x86  - boot\x86\pxeboot.n12
         x64  - boot\x64\pxeboot.n12
         ia64 - boot\ia64\bootmgfw.efi

Banned GUIDs List:

Boot Image Policy:
     Default image type for x64 clients: Both
     Default boot images:
         x86  - 
         x64  - 
         ia64 -

WDS Client Policy:
     Logging policy:
         Enabled: No
         Logging level: Info

     Unattend policy:
         Enabled: No
         Command-line precedence: No
         WDS unattend files:
             x86  - 
             x64  - 
             ia64 -

OSChooser Policy:
     Menu name:

Server Auto-Refresh Policy:
     Refresh period: 900 seconds

BCD Refresh Policy:
     Enabled: No
     Refresh period: 60 minutes

Auto-Add Policy:
     Policy: Disabled
     Poll interval: 10 seconds
     Max retry count: 2160 times
     Message: 
     Retention period:
         Approved devices: 30 days
         Other devices: 1 days
     Defaults for x86:
         Referral server: 
         Boot program path: 
         WDS client unattend file path: 
         Boot image path: 
         User: Domain Admins
         Join rights: Full
         Join domain: Yes
     Defaults for x64:
         Referral server: 
         Boot program path: 
         WDS client unattend file path: 
         Boot image path: 
         User: Domain Admins
         Join rights: Full
         Join domain: Yes
     Defaults for ia64:
         Referral server: 
         Boot program path: 
         WDS client unattend file path: 
         Boot image path: 
         User: Domain Admins
         Join rights: Full
         Join domain: Yes

WDS PXE Providers:
     Name: BINLSVC
     Path: C:\Windows\system32\binlsvc.dll
     Order: 1
     Critical: Yes

WDS Transport Server Policy:
     IPv4 Source: Range
         Start IP: 239.0.0.1
         End IP: 239.0.0.254
     Start Port: 64001
     End Port: 65000
     Network Profile: 100Mbps

[-----------------------------------------------------------------------------]

The command completed successfully.

There is a little known Server Selection feature in Windows Deployment Services in Windows Server 2008 R2.
Its not documented and it's not supported by Microsoft, but it can be very useful for lab and test scenarios...

How to enable it?  Simply go to HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\WDSServer\Providers\WDSPXE\Providers\BINLSVC and set AllowServerSelection to 1.

After restarting the Windows Deployment Service, you get the server selection option by pressing F11 and the PXE client will now discover all PXE Servers which have this registry key set and allow you to select which one you want to use.

Initial PXE Boot Screen

PXE/WDS discovery process

I came across a WDS problem which seemed familiar at first, but in the end turned out to be something “unexpected”:
“ProxyDHCP: No reply to request on port 4011”

Typically, you would end up looking at articles like KB259670 (PXE clients computers do not start when you configure the Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol server to use options 60, 66, 67)… but this was different some clients/servers worked and some didn’t…

Symptom

When initiating a PXE Boot to the WDS server, the client receives a IP address from the DHCP server, but eventually times out with error “ProxyDHCP: No reply to request on port 4011”
However, other clients/servers have no problem PXE booting to the WDS server and getting boot/installation images.

Cause

There is a database named “Auto-Add Devices database”, used when you are performing the “Pending Devices” actions.  It stores the records for machines with a “pending devices” status and/or devices with an “approved” status.

image_thumb4

Solution

The computer GUID is marked as rejected in the Auto-Add database. After a computer has been marked as rejected, the computer will not be able to PXE boot.
You can clear the entry in the Auto-Add database by deleting all pending computer records (by running wdsutil /Delete-AutoAddDevices /DeviceType:RejectedDevices) or enabling the record to be purged automatically (as mentioned above).

C:\> wdsutil /Delete-AutoAddDevices /DeviceType:ApprovedDevices
C:\> wdsutil /Delete-AutoAddDevices /DeviceType:RejectedDevices

To delete computers that are pending, rejected or approved from the Auto-Add database, use wdsutil /Delete-AutoAddDevices using the syntex below:

WDSUTIL /Delete-AutoAddDevices [/Server:<Server name>] /DeviceType:{PendingDevices | RejectedDevices |ApprovedDevices} 

More Information

The records in the Auto-Add Devices database are purged every 24 hours and the cleanup of any devices with an approved status occurs every 30 days.
You can look at these intervals using the WDS CLI under “Configuration Information - Auto-Add Policy”

C:\> wdsutil /get-server /show:config [/server:yourRemoteServer]

image 

These values can be changed using the WDS CLI

C:\> wdsutil /set-server /AutoAddPolicy /RetentionPeriod /Approved:<Time in days> /Others:<Time in days>

The Auto-Add Devices database (named Binlsvcdb.mdb) can be found in the RemoteInstall\MGMT folder. The database is created by BINLSVC the first time the pending devices policy is enabled. 

Related reading:

  • KB259670 - PXE clients computers do not start when you configure the Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol server to use options 60, 66, 67
  • KB244036 - Description of PXE Interaction Among PXE Client, DHCP, and RIS Server
  • How to Manage Client Computers - Auto-Add Database section
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